Quote of the Day

What should concern us is not that we can’t take what we read on the internet on trust – of course you can’t, it’s just people talking – but that we ever got into the dangerous habit of believing what we read in the newspapers or saw on the TV.

“What should concern us is not that we can’t take what we read on the internet on trust – of course you can’t, it’s just people talking – but that we ever got into the dangerous habit of believing what we read in the newspapers or saw on the TV.” — Douglas Adams, How to Stop Worrying and Learn to Love the Internet

No One Would Have Friends

He said he disagreed strongly.

I had quoted Mary Renault: “It is better to believe in men too rashly, and regret, than believe too meanly” and he believed it was better to trust no one and have them prove themselves.

I was surprised he felt so strongly about it. “That’s a negative point of view!”

“Not at all,” he replied. “I avoid disappointment and get the occasional pleasant surprise. That sounds positive to me.”

“And you think everyone should be like you?”

“Of course!”

“Well If no one trusted anybody, there never would be an opportunity to find out and then no one would have any friends.”  This would have been the coup de grâce — had this conversation taken place. Before opening my mouth, I remembered that Jonathan Swift once said “Reasoning will never make a man correct an ill opinion, which by reasoning he never acquired.

Reasoning will never make a man correct an ill opinion, which by reasoning he never acquired.